<br /> Lee Letter: n340_0159

Washington and Lee University

Sender: Richard Henry Lee
Recipient: Patrick Henry

Dear Sir,

It is with much pleasure I inform you that our affairs in the Jersies wear
as favorable an aspect as we could possibly <hope fo>r. And if the
militia remain with the General un<til the othe>r recruits get up, I
verily believe the business of <the campaign> will be nearly finished
for the winter. Wonder<ful as it m>ay seem, yet it is fact that our
great successes in Jersey since the 24th of Decr. have been obtained by
an army chiefly irregular, and much inferior in number to the regular
force of the enemy.

And the Army that now so greatly and so ignominiously distress the British
force at Brunswick is inferior in number to the one it now confines to
the Brunswick hills. The Committee of Congress at Philadelphia tell us
a report has come there of an engagement between Gen. Sullivans
detatchment of the army near Brunswick and a strong detatchment of the
enemy. The issue not certainly known but they say a person immediately
from Brunswick relates that the British light horse came in much
confusion from the field of battle to that Town calling for a
reenforcement. We therefore hope hourly for good news from that
quarter, nor are we without hopes of good accounts from N. York. We
know they were in a very defenceless situation lately, and if the
motions of Gen. Heath are not too slow, so that reenforcement may come
from Rhode Island or be sent from Jersey for the defence of N. York, he
will go near to free that City from the Tyrants Troops. We have no late
news from Europe except by the way of Hallifax, where the report is,
that a War between France & G. Britain is inevitable, and the B.
Officers there say “the damnd Rebels would keep America yet.” I hope
the rightful Owners will keep America, and in despite of all the
efforts of Tyranny & its Tools.

Farewell dear Sir, affectionately
yours,

Richard Henry Lee

Notes:

Receiver’s copy (photocopy), George Washington Papers,
Library of Congress.

Printed in James Curtis Ballagh, The Letters of Richard Henry Lee, Volume 1, 1762 – 1778, pp. 251 – 52. The receiver’s copy is mutilated, and missing text supplied from Ballagh.