<br /> Lee Letter: n595

Washington and Lee University

Sender: John Hanson
Recipient: Thomas Sim Lee

Dear sir,

The painting of your Carriage is not yet quite finished. Would recommend
your Sending the Ballance of the money as soon as possible. Should the
Carriage be finished before the money is ready a pretence may be made
for raising the Exchange now between 80 & 90.

The House of Delegates I am informed have Come into a resolution of Calling
in the old Continental money at forty for one. Their views I suppose
extend no further than to Call in as much of the old as will put into
Circulation Our part of the Continental new Emission on which, And the
Support of its Credit, much depends. I am afraid that the want of
unanimity in that House, will much embarrass their proceedings, but
hope the Sordid Interest and private views of Individuals will not be
Suffered to prevail So far as to defeat measures Calculated for the
public good. It ought to be Considered that our All is at Stake and
that every exertion is necessary for our Safety. The Army is again in
great want of provisions, and unless Sufficient Supplies are Sent
forward before the hard weather Sets in, they must be in great
distress.

The Cork provision fleet so long looked for at New York is not yet Arrived – the embarkation of Troops at that place is Still going on, destined it
is probable to reinforce their Army in Virginia. – For Southern news I
refer you to the last paper.

My finances are very low And Shall in a very little time be in disagreeable
Situation. I hope therefore you will have it in your power to Send me A
reinforcement by the next post, for which I shall be much
obliged.1

My Compliments to Mrs Lee and wishing you health And happiness, Am
Dear sir, your Excellencys most hble Servt,

John Hanson

Notes:

Receiver’s copy, Lee, Horsey and Carroll Papers deposit (1985), Maryland
Historical Society.

1 See George Plater to Lee, November 13, 1780, note 2.

2 This day Hanson sent a nearly identical copy of the second and third
paragraphs of this letter to Charles Carroll of Carrollton, for which
see the Carroll Papers, MdHi.