<br /> Lee Letter: n720

Washington and Lee University

Sender: John Hanson
Recipient: Thomas Sim Lee

My Dear Sir

Your Excellencys favour of the 27th ult. I received yesterday. I Sent you
inclosed by the last post Herons letters and the Account of wheat
received. I will give directions to have a hat immediately made for you
tho’ my finances are very low.

Our European intelligence respecting the negotiation for peace is not upon
the whole very favourable, the British it appears are for
procrastination, And it is probable they will try another Campaign at
least, in hopes of another 12th of April. If the Issue Should prove
unsuccessful, they will not be in a much worse Situation than at
present, and a fortunate Stroke at the Combined fleet, would put them
in a much better. They will I think for a while longer, trust to the
Chapter of Accidents.

Gen. Washington has lately received Advices from Canada (which may be
depended on And which has been Communicated to
Congress)1 that between three and four
thousand British troops are Expected there from England, And 1500
foreign troops from N. York to Strengthen their posts in that Country,
while the whole Force of the British nation is to be employed against
the french and Spanish possessions in the West Indies. That Col.
Campbell had lately had a meeting with the Indians in Canada, at which
this informant was present. That Campbell told them, that the King from
Compassion to his American Subjects, had ordered him to Acquaint them,
that he had determined to Cease Hostilities, and that they must not
therefore make Any further incursions or ravages on the Settlements of
his Subjects, but must remain quiet untill further orders. The Indian
Sacham Answered, that he was very Sensible of the present Situation of
the Indians, that the English had been beat everywhere and were no
longer able to Carry on the war, And that the Indians must now Submit
to the Americans or be Sacraficed. He Concluded by telling Campbell
that he Should no longer listen to his lyes, and went off much
dissatisfyed.

With respect I am, Your Excellencys most humble Servt,

J.H.

Notes:

Receiver’s copy, Lee, Horsey, and Carroll Papers deposit (1988), Maryland
Historical Society.

1 This intelligence was enclosed in Washington’s September 26 letter to
President Hanson, which was read in Congress on September 30 and is
in PCC, item 152, 10:743 – 45; and Washington, Writings (Fitzpatrick),
25:208 – 9.