THE

CAMP-FIRES OF GENERAL LEE,

FROM THE
PENISULA TO APPOMATOX COURT-HOUSE.
WITH REMINISCENCES OF THE MARCH, THE CAMP, THE
BIVOUAC AND OF PERSONAL ADVENTURE.

BY

EDWARD S. ELLIS,

AUTHOR OF “THE YOUNG PIONEER SERIES,” “THE LOG CABIN SERIES,” ETC.

PHILADELPHIA:
HENRY HARRISON & CO.

Copyrighted Feb., 1886.

LEE AND JACKSON AT THE BATTLE OF COLD HARBOR.

INTRODUCTION.

“THE CAMP-FIRES OF GENERAL LEE” aims to be a truthful narrative of the great part played by the Army of Northern Virginia under its illustrious commander in the most terrific campaigns of modern times. When the wounding of General Johnston, early in the war, compelled him to turn over his command to General Lee, the latter entered upon such a display of generalship that he speedily proved himself one of the foremost military leaders of the century. His campaigns represented the highest development of the science of war, and will command admiration for ages to come.

The history of those brilliant manœuvres, grand combinations and tremendous battles cannot be studied too closely by American youth. The incense wafted upward from Manassas, the Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Appomattox was the same, in truth, as that which was borne aloft from the fields of Bunker Hill, Monmouth, Trenton, Valley Forge and Yorktown, where Jerseymen and Virginians, South Carolinians and Green Mountain Boys, stood shoulder to shoulder in the struggle for liberty. The passions of the later days have departed, and those who arrayed themselves under the Stars and Bars are now among the most ardent defenders of the Union. None is quicker to give recognition of the valor of the Boy in Blue than he who wore the Gray. Brave men mutually respect each other, and no stronger ties of friendship can be formed than those that now bind together the different sections of the Union. We can, therefore, enjoy the fighting of the battles over again, each former opponent conceding the full meed of praise to the other and uttering nothing in malice. We have sought to give, so far as possible, a realistic narrative of those days by presenting pictures of the bivouac, the camp-fire and some of the numerous personal reminiscences of those engaged in the conflict.

In the preparation of these pages much assistance has been received from other histories and parties. Recognition is specially due Rev. J. William Jones, D.D., of Richmond, secretary of the Southern Historical Society, who placed many documents and papers at the author’s disposal.

CONTENTS.


I.
THE CAMP-FIRES IN THE PENINSULA.

CHAPTER I.

ON THE CHICKAHOMINY

CHAPTER II.

MCCLELLAN’S RETREAT

CHAPTER III.

THE LINE OF BATTLE

CHAPTER IV.

THE LAST BATTLE

CHAPTER V.

ROBERT E. LEE


II.
THE CAMP-FIRES IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

CHAPTER VI.

ON THE RAPPAHANNOCK

CHAPTER VII.

MANŒUVRING FOR POSITION

CHAPTER VIII.

GENERAL POPE’S MOVEMENTS

CHAPTER IX.

THE MARCH OF THE CONQUEROR


III.
THE CAMP-FIRE OF ANTIETAM.

CHAPTER X.

FACING NORTHWARD

CHAPTER XI.

HARPER’S FERRY

CHAPTER XII.

“SPECIAL ORDERS No. 191”

CHAPTER XIII.

AT BAY

CHAPTER XIV.

ANTIETAM

CHAPTER XV.

ANTIETAM (Concluded)


IV.
THE CAMP-FIRES OF FREDERICKSBURG AND CHANCELLOESVILLE.

CHAPTER XVI.

RESTING ON THEIR ARMS

CHAPTER XVII.

STUART’S RAID INTO PENNSYLVANIA

CHAPTER XVIII.

THE UNION ADVANCE

CHAPTER XIX.

THE ATTACK ON THE CONFEDERATE RIGHT

CHAPTER XX

THE DECISIVE STRUGGLE

CHAPTER XXI.

BURNSIDE’S MUD-MARCH.—IN WINTER QUARTERS


V.
THE CAMP-FIRE OF CHANCELLORSVILLE.

CHAPTER XXII.

PRELIMINARY MOVEMENTS

CHAPTER XXIII.

JACKSON’S FLANK MOVEMENT

CHAPTER XXIV.

THE FALL OF STONEWALL JACKSON

CHAPTER XXV.

THE LAST STRUGGLE AT CHANCELLORSVILLE

VI.
THE CAMP-FIRE OF GETTYSBURG.

CHAPTER XXVI.

PRELIMINARY MOVEMENTS

CHAPTER XXVII.

MANŒUVRING FOR BATTLE

CHAPTER XXVIII.

GETTYSBURG: FIRST DAY

CHAPTER XXIX.

GETTYSBURG: SECOND DAY

CHAPTER XXX.

GETTYSBURG: THIRD AND LAST DAY

CHAPTER XXXI.

THE CONFEDERATE RETREAT

VII.
THE SECOND CAMP-FIRE IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

CHAPTER XXXII.

A SERIES OF MANŒUVRES

CHAPTER XXXIII.

THE CAMP-FIRE OF MINE RUN


VIII.
THE LAST CAMP-FIRE.

CHAPTER XXXIV.

THE WILDERNESS

CHAPTER XXXV

FROM SPOTTSYLVANIA TO THE CHICKAHOMINY

CHAPTER XXXVI.

CLOSE OF THE CAMPAIGN OF 1864

CHAPTER XXXVII.

CLOSING IN

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

THE LAST CAMP-FIRE
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