Robert E. Lee and His Children
Virginia Louise Lee

Notes

[Chapter 1]

1. Edmund Jennings Lee, Lee of Virginia (Philadelphia: E. J. Lee, 1895), p. 412; Douglas Southall Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I (New York, London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1934), pp. 11–12.

2. Ibid.

3. F. W. Alexander, Stratford Hall and the Lees Connected with its History (hereinafter referred to a Stratford Hall) (Oak Grove, Virginia: privately printed, 1912), p. 168. At this time there were only two older brothers, Charles and Sydney (called Smith), and an older sister, Anne Kinloch, but a second sister, Catherine Mildred, was born in 1811 in Alexandria.

4. Cazenove G. Lee, Lee Chronicle (New York: New York University Press, 1957), pp. 89–90.

5. Henry Lee, Memoirs of the War in the Southern Department of the United States (hereinafter referred to as Memoirs) (New York: University Publishing Co., 1869), p. 11; Robert W. Winston, Robert E. Lee (New York: William Morrow & Co., 1934), pp. 3–4, for a romanticized version of Lee loyalty to the crown, quoted from Sir Walter Scott’s novel Woodstock; E. J. Lee, Lee of Virginia, p. 35; Burton J. Hendrick, The Lees of Virginia (Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1935), p. 3.

6. Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee (New York & London: D. Appleton & Co., 1910), p. 3. There are conflicting claims as to the English origin of the Virginia Lees, but Fitzhugh Lee accepts Shropshire, citing the fact that Col. Richard Lee, the first of the family in Virginia, used the Shropshire coat of arms. General R. E. Lee, in his biography of his father prefaced to Henry Lee’s Memoirs, also accepts Shropshire as the English seat of the Virginia Lees, see Henry Lee, op. cit., p. 11. Cf. C. G. Lee, Lee Chronicle, pp. 7–11; E. J. Lee, Lee of Virginia, pp. 33, 49. A more recent identification may be found in “Richard Lee, Emigrant,” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, LXII (Jan. 1954), pp. 3–49.

7. Alexander, Stratford Hall, p. 28; C. G. Lee, Lee Chronicle, p. 19.

8. Ibid., p. 25, pp. 55–57; B. J. Hendrick, Lees of Virginia, p. 30, for an excellent sketch of the usually ignored John.

9. Ibid., genealogical table opposite p. 438; Alexander, Stratford Hall, p. 42; C. G. Lee, Lee Chronicle, p. 57; and E. J. Lee, Lee of Virginia, p. 103, all give Thomas as the fifth son, but F. Lee, General Lee, p. 5; J. William Jones, Life and Letters of Roebrt Edward Lee (hereinafter referred to as L and L) (New York & Washington: The Neale Publishing Co., 1906), p. 15; and A. L. Long, Memoirs of Robert E. Lee (hereinafter referred to as Memoirs) (New York & Philadelphia, etc.: J. M. Stoddard & Co., 1886), p. 19, all give Thomas as the fourth son, perhaps because the first son, John, died in infancy as similarly Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, p.12 cites R. E. Lee as Anne Carter Lee’s fourth child despite the facsimile of the family Bible record opposite p. 12 which clearly shows that he was the fifth child, and that his oldest brother and the one discounted, Algernon Sidney Lee, lived to to be almost a year and a half old.

10. Alexander, Stratford Hall, pp. 62–63, has an excellent description of the home and grounds; C. G. Lee, Lee Chronicle, devotes two entire chapters to Stratford Hall, one on its builder, pp. 55–68, the other on its history, pp. 85–112.

11. Long, Memoirs, p. 139, R. E. Lee to daughters, 22 Nov. 1861.

12. Robert E. Lee, Jr., Recollections and Letters of General Robert E. Lee (hereinafter referred to as Recollections) (New York: Garden City Pub. Co., 1924), p. 59, R. E. Lee to Mrs. R. E. Lee, 25 Dec. 1861.

13. E. J. Lee, Lee of Virginia, pp. 357–358, p. 361; Hendrick, Lees of Virginia, pp. 377–378.

14. Ibid.; Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, pp. 27–28.

15. Ibid., p. 26 (William Henry Harrison and Benjamin Harrison).

16. Thomas Boyd, Light-Horse Harry Lee (New York, London: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1931) is the most thorough coverage of his life.

17. Alexander, Stratford Hall, p. 151, for picture of this medal, also pp. 147–168 for short but highlighted biography of “Light-Horse Harry”; and E. J. Lee, Lee of Virginia, pp. 329–356, for medal and biography.

18. Boyd, Light-Horse Harry Lee, pp. 138–143; Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, pp. 4–5, for a penetrating analysis of this change.

19. Ibid., p. 13.

20. Charles Carter, “Will,” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, XXII (Dec. 1914), 380–382.

21. Boyd, Light-Horse Harry Lee, pp. 325–326.

22. In 1913 his remains were removed to Lexington, Virginia, and reinterred in the vault in the Lee Chapel where his son Robert is buried, Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, p. 87. See Franklin L. Riley, General Robert E. Lee After Appomattox (New York: MacMillan Co., 1922), p. 229, and opposite p. 224 for picture of the mausoleum.

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