Robert E. Lee and His Children
Virginia Louise Lee

Notes
[Chapter 5]

1. F. Lee, General Lee, R. E. Lee to Mildred Lee, 27 Mar. 1857 (p. 66).

2. Jones, L and L, pp. 38–39, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 30 Nov. 1845.

3. Maurice, Lee, Soldier p. 13.

4. Jones, L and L, p. 89, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 15 Feb. 1858, offering to resign from the army to secure his children’s inheritance; Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, pp. 382–383; Infra.

5. R. E. Lee, pp. 46–47. Further evidence of his practical care is the special provision in his will for Annie, who because of an eye injury he felt might need more aid than the other children. Copy of will in Lee MSS, Library of Congress; original in courthouse, Lexington, Virginia.

6. R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 14.

7. Winston, R. E. Lee, p. 35; Jones, L and L, p. 53.

8. R. E. Lee, Recollections, pp. 9–10.

9. Jones, L and L, p. 94, R. E. Lee to W. H. F. Lee, 30 May 1858.

10. Ibid., pp. 72–75.

11. Ibid.; R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 14.

12. F. Lee, General Lee, p. 34, R. E. Lee to Boo and Rooney, 24 Dec. 1846.

13. Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, p. 303.

14. Heitman, Hist. Register, p. 624; Alexander, Stratford Hall, p. 311.

15. Ibid.; Wayland, R. E. Lee and Family, p. 41.

16. Jones, L and L, pp. 71–74; Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, pp. 309–310.

17. Ibid., p. 312.

18. Cullum, Biog. Register, p. 33; Heitman, Hist. Register, p. 624; For Custis’s class standing see Army Registers (Washington, D.C.: War Department) for the years 1852, p. 35, 1853, p. 34, 1854, p. 35, and 1855, p. 35. His father was Superintendent of the Academy at the time. Infra.

19. Jones, L and L, p. 73, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 4 May 1851.

20. Lee MSS, Virginia Historical Society, Custis Lee to Rooney Lee, 15 March 1853.

21. MacDonald, Mrs. R. E. Lee, p. 115; Henry Adams, Education of Henry Adams (New York: Modern Library, 1931), pp. 56–59, for a succinct appraisal of Rooney Lee as a student.

22. Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, p.312; supra.

23. Heitman, Biog. Register, p. 626.

24. Jones, L and L, p. 113, pp. 121–122; Winston, R. E. Lee, p. 69.

25. R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 4.

26. Wells, Lee, Friend, p. 271; MacDonald, Mrs. R. E. Lee, p. 122.

27. Alexandria County MSS Records for will and the provisions which made settlement so difficult. Will probated 7 Dec. 1857, Alexandria County Will Book 7, p. 267, p. 278 and p. 369, for Lee’s inventory of the estate, and p. 485, Book 7, and p. 92, Book 8, for his accounting of the estate.

28. Jones, L and L, pp. 94—9[5], R. E. Lee to W. H. F. Lee, 7 Aug. 1858, regarding Rooney’s marriage, also p. 89, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 15 Feb. 1858, regarding settlement of the estate.

29. Ibid., R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 17 Mar. 1858. This letter reveals the fine reciprocal relationship between the father and son.

30. Wayland, Lee and Family, p. 65, quotes a letter from Dr. George Bolling Lee, son of W. H. F. Lee, relating to the physical appearance of R. E. Lee and his three sons when grown. G. B. Lee to J. Wayland, 24 Oct. 1935.

31. Letter from Mary Custis Lee deButts, daughter of R. E. Lee, Jr. to Virginia Lee, 4 August 1959.

32. Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, opp. p. 444, for facsimile of the resignation; F. Lee, General Lee, pp. 87–88; for a different viewpoint on Lee’s resignation see Bradford, Lee the American, pp. 28–32; Heitman, Hist. Register, p. 625.

33. F. Lee, General Lee, p. 94; Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, p. 444, both give the date of this letter as 13 May (F. Lee), and 15 May (Freeman), almost two weeks after Custis had resigned. Yet R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 31, quotes a letter from Lee to Mrs. Lee, dated 16 May, in which he asks her to direct Custis to his room at the Spotswood if Custis arrived during his absence. It hardly seems logical for him to advise Custis to make his own choice on the 15th of May, and yet expect him for duty on the 16th, and he surely must have known by then that Custis had resigned on May 2.

34. Heitman, Hist. Register, p. 624; R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 32.

35. Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. I, p. 511.

36. Ibid.; R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 44, pp. 69–70.

37. R. E. Lee, Recollections, pp. 73, 78, 82, 85, 87, 93, 96, 102, 106, 130, 137.

38. Ibid., pp. 140, 146; Jones, L and L, p. 266; Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. IV, p. 19.

39. R. E. Lee, Recollections, pp. 103–105; Cooke, R. E.. Lee, p. 432; Bradford, Lee the American, p. 101; John Dooley, Confederate Soldier (Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 1945), J. T. Durkin, ed., p. 71, speaks for the soldiers in the ranks about their conditions; Taylor, Four Years, p. 38.

40. Ibid., p. 77.

41. Cooke, R. E. Lee, p. 434.Ibid, p. 77.

42. Riley, Lee After Appomattox, p. 206; F. Lee, General Lee, pp. 286–287, pp. 363–364; Long, Memoirs, p. 471; Jones, L and L, p. 304, in a letter to Custis General Lee admits his strength had diminished since his illness at Fredericksburg. Cooke, R. E. Lee, pp. 158–159, pictures the Spartan conditions under which Lee lived in the field, and Taylor, Four Years, p. 141, by contrast, further reveals those conditions.

43. Jones, L and L, p. 211; Long, Memoirs, p. 397.

44. Ibid., p. 170; Taylor, Four Years, p. 40; Cooke, R. E. Lee, p. 60; Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1881, Series I), Vol. II, Part I, Special Order 126, 2 June 1862, p. 571.

45. Maurice, Lee, Soldier, pp. 110–122, for a British General’s interpretation of this campaign; Taylor, Four Years, pp. 49–56, for comparative strengths of the opposing armies, cf. Battles and Leaders of the Civil War (New York: The Century Co., 1888), pp. 313–317. For the story of the battles as told by participating Federal and Confederate general officers, see pp. 319–392, op. cit. The Congressional investigation of the Federal defeat and retreat during the Seven Days, with McClellan’s reasons therefor, may be found in Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1863, in Three Parts), Part I, pp. 23–27. Vol. II, Official Records, is devoted entirely to the Seven Days Campaign.

46. R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 74.

47. Jones, L and L, p. 146, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 3 Sept. 1861.

48. Ibid., p. 160, R. E. Lee to W. H. F. Lee, 16 Feb. 1862 (Rooney had been promoted to Brigadier General).

49. Ibid., p. 199, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 10 Nov. 1862.

50. Ibid., p. 146, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 3 Sept. 1861.

51. Ibid., p. 149, R. E. Lee to W. H. F. Lee, 12 Oct. 1861.

52. Ibid., p. 228, R. E. Lee to W. H. F. Lee, Mar. 1863.

53. Ibid., p. 284, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, 27 Sept. 1863.

54. Ibid., p. 189, R. E. Lee to Custis Lee, Aug. 1863.

55. F. Lee, General Lee, p. 260.

56. Ibid., p. 263; R. E. Lee, Recollections, pp. 96–102. Perhaps it was the dignity of his rank but from the war on Lee’s second son was no longer called Rooney by the family but Fitzhugh.

57. Ibid., p. 117–118; Jones, L and L, pp. 297–298; So opposed was Gen. Lee to seeking special favors for his sons he refused to seek special action to have Fitzhugh exchanged even under such tragic circumstances. See Jones, Reminiscences, p. 184, for a report of the incident by the minister who was acting as intermediary. Mary B. Chesnut, Diary from Dixie (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1949), B. A. Williams, ed., p. 396.

58. Long, Memoirs, pp. 182–183; Jones, Reminiscences, p. 183.

59. Freeman, R. E. Lee, Vol. III, p. 394; Heitman, Hist. Register, p. 624.

60. Ibid., p. 626; Freeman, Lee, Vol. II, p. 98, p. 417. Not to be confused with his cousin, Fitzhugh Lee, also a cavalry general, but more often called “Fitz” Lee.

61. R. E. Lee, Recollections, p. 81.

62. Ibid. pp. 119–120.

63. That they continued to do so in civil life, thereby earning the respect and esteem of their associates, in the best traditions of the Carters and the Lees, is amply evidenced in the enconiums uttered at their deaths by those who knew them best. For R. E. Lee, Jr., see Gordon McCabe, “Robert E. Lee Jr.,” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, XXIII (Feb. 1915), xvi, and for G. W. C. Lee, see James Howe, op. cit., XXXXVIII (Oct. 1940), 315–327. W. H. F. Lee served in the U.S. Congress for three terms. House tributes are in House Misc. Doc. #320, 52d Cong., 1st Sess. (Washington: Govt Printing Office, Feb. 6, 1892), pp. 1–107; Senate tributes in Cong. Record, 52d COng., 1st Sess. (Washington: Govt. Printing Office, Vol. XXIII, 4 Mar. 1892), pp. 1726–1732.

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