Camp Fredg 23 May 1863

 

My dear Mary

I recd yesterday your letter of the 21st with the socks & am much obliged to you for their reparation. I See though you are relapsing into your old error, supposing that I have a superabundance of time & have only my own pleasures to attend to. You do not recollect that after an absence of Some days, that matters accumulate formidably, & that my attention is entirely engrossed in public business. I am unable therefore even to write to you, though my thoughts are always with you. You must not therefore be always expecting letters from me, for I expect that I am able to write but seldom at & long intervals. I send down the pillow case as you request. It is in worse Condition than I supposed & I do not think you will be able to do anything with it. I Can do very well without it & I may have to dispense with the pillow, so the case will be little service. I also return the letter of poor little Laura. The death of Washn was a heavy blow to them all & I truly sympathize in their grief. I am glad you heard from F__ & R__ & that Charlotte is so well accommodated. I hope she will be able to spend a little time with F__ though that is problematical. I hope indeed the Drs. prescriptions under the blessing of Heaven may relieve you of your painful affliction for I Can do nothing but offer my poor feeble prayers to Almighty God for your relief, & which ascend night & morg to his throne of grace! I am glad to hear that the Pres: has given his permission to C. to join the Army. I hope his inclinations prompt him to join this, & tell him I send a formal invitation for him to join me. You must give much love to Mr & Mrs Caskie & my heartfelt thanks for all their Kindness to you in your great necessity. God alone Can reward them for their charity & benevolence & I pray that his blessings may be showered upon them in this world & the next. Tell Miss N__ I suspect Capt Smith Lee has her beaux, & that he would like to capture her & Miss Lilly too. Col: Withers would not interfere with them for he knows how highly I value them. They will all return though tell her when they find I have gone. She shall have a plenty if she will come up here. Thank my poor little Agnes for her affectionate note. I hope her little propellors are not becoming afflicted too. She must exercise them more. She had better take my advice & ask some of her friends to employ her in their cornfields. Give much love to my “precious life”. I am very sorry I Could not See her, & God only Knows when we shall meet again. She must write to her Pa’a__ & not eat plum cakes.

With great affection very truly yours             R E Lee

 

 

 

Source: Transcribed from photocopy of original letter, Lee Family Papers, Mss1 L 51 c 453, Virginia Museum of History and Culture, Richmond

Transcribed by Colin Woodward, 2022 May 9